Where Do You Find Incredible Creatures and Fantastic Beasts? The Kohl’s Design It! Lab.

Explore the NEW June Menu in the Kohl’s Design It! Lab

June has arrived! Summer is here! Anything is possible. It’s fantastic! And speaking of fantastic, our imaginative and chimerical Kohl’s Design It! Lab designers have developed a brand new June menu featuring implausible projects inspired by mythological creatures, legends, lore, and hoaxes.

Bigfoot Shoe Covers

Hoaxes are fun. Piltdown Man and the Great Stock Exchange Fraud of 1814 were quite a hoot back in the day. Sure, it’s a lot more fun to actually perpetrate a hoax. A harmless one, of course. And we’re here to help. But which hoax should you perpetrate? Crop circles are geometrically elaborate and require extensive planning – maps, CAD software, night vision goggles, a large field with very tall grass, a flat board with a rope attached for smushing down the tall grass. That’s a lot of work for an unsolved mystery that’s been thoroughly solved (and debunked).

You could dress up as the Loch Ness Monster, but that might be a challenge given that Nessie is a large aquatic monster that lives in one specific lake in Scotland, and we’re nowhere near Scotland.

Why not Bigfoot? There are a seemingly endless number of out-of-breath weirdos with TV shows chasing Bigfoot across the country. Imagine the fun you could have by leaving “Bigfoot tracks” behind on your next walk in the woods. Create your own Big Foot Shoe Covers for your first foray into hoax-perpetrating fun!

Hodag Horns

This fantastic beast is “native” to Rhinelander, Wisconsin. It has the head of a frog, the body of an elephant (not the size, just the shape), the back of a dinosaur, and the horns of a bull. The hodag was first “discovered” by surveyor and timber cruiser Eugene Shepard back the late 1800’s. He “captured” the creature and displayed it at the first Oneida County Fair. And thousands of people paid money to see it.

Shepard had a pretty good thing going until 1893 when a group scientists from the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. arrived to examine the creature. Unsurprisingly, the scientists labeled it a hoax… mostly because it was a hoax.

If you’re quiet and careful and preternaturally observant, you might be able to see the hodag scampering through the woods near Rhinelander. Design your own horns inspired by this homegrown Wisconsin beast.

Manatee Mermaid Bobbleheads

Early European explorers mistook these gentle, adorably dopey-looking aquatic mammals for mermaids. Which? Is completely bonkers, and probably says less about manatees and more about the malleable imaginations of early European explorers, especially when under the influence of fever, heatstroke, and/or rum.

Manatees look nothing like mermaids. They look like Wilfred Brimley*. They’re called sea cows for a reason**. Anyway, manatees are awesome. Using laser cut cardboard and folding techniques, make your own bobble head of these friendly, underwater creatures that look absolutely nothing like mermaids.

*To be fair, Mr. Brimley looks more like a curmudgeonly walrus than a manatee, but the point stands.
**Though they don’t look much like cows either.

Draco Genus

Some dragons have four legs, some have two. Some dragons are covered in armor made of impenetrable scales. Some have leathery wings. Some breathe fire. Some are cunning. Some are wise. Some are protectors and guardians. Some are rapacious and evil and can lay waste to an army of Elves and Dwarves if they put their backs into it.

Some dragons are smaller and real, like the common gliding dragon (Draco sumatranus). Native to Southeast Asia, these lizards have wing-like flaps that allow them to glide up to 200 feet. Design your own dragon origami inspired by the very real gliding lizards.

Griffin Beak

Imagine that you’re a gold miner living in the kingdom of Scythia about 3,000 years ago. Science isn’t exactly your thing, though you have at least a working knowledge of geology and mineralogy.

As you’re digging for gold, you unwittingly unearth the skeleton of a monster. It seems to have the body of a ferocious lion with the head and beak of a titanic and terrifying eagle. What you found might be the fossilized remains of a dinosaur, maybe a Protoceratops. Of course, no one knows what dinosaurs are yet, and you’re not going to stick around long enough to become the world’s first paleontologist. All you want to do is run away as fast as you can before this creature – whatever it is – comes back to life and hunts you down for disturbing its bones.

The good news is you’re not a Scythian gold miner. The better news is that you can become the legendary griffin. Design and build a beak that opens and closes when you move your hands.

The Legend of the Milwaukee Lion

Remember when the days were long and rolled beneath a deep blue sky? We do, too. It was the summer of 2015. The last perfect summer. And one warm evening in late July, a lion wandered into town… and right into our hearts. Thinking back to those bygone days of our golden innocence, we can’t help wonder if the lion was perhaps something more than a lion. Maybe it was symbol of the power and fragility of youth. Or maybe it was a cougar. Cougars used to roam Wisconsin. So that’s probably it. Anyway, it was something fun to talk about at the time. Make your own cougar paws inspired by this once-native big cat.

Demeter Automata

Demeter was the ancient Greek goddess of agriculture and the harvest. Terrible things happened to her (as they do in ancient Greek mythology), and she had to search the Underworld for her daughter Persephone. While Demeter was gone, autumn and winter happened. When she returned, spring and summer returned to the world. Create an automata depicting modern agriculture inspired by Demeter and this early myth of the seasons.

Zeus’ Bolt Tea Light

While not quite as cool as Thor (it’s the hammer, really), Zeus is a pretty fantastic mythological entity. Powerful, capricious, jealous, always turning people into swans and whatnot, and able to hurl thunderbolts, being Zeus seems like a pretty sweet gig. We can’t help you hurl actual thunderbolts, but we can help you hurl plush thunderbolts. Better yet, you can help you hurl plush thunderbolts. Make your own Zeus’ Bolt Tea Light, and get zappin’!

Join us for a month of incredible creatures and fantastical beasts. And where do you find them? The Kohl’s Design It! Lab.

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500 N Harbor Dr
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General Admission

Adults $19
Child (3-17) $16
Child 2 & Under $Free
Senior (60+) $16
College Student* $14
Military Active and Veterans* $14

*Valid ID Required.

Purchase tickets at the Ticket Counter. Prices are subject to change.

Hours

Opens tomorrow at 9a
Tues-Fri 9a - 4p
Sat & Sun 10a - 5p

Getting Here

We are located on Milwaukee’s lakefront with easy access on and off of the expressway.

500 N Harbor Dr
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Get Directions
Adults $19
Child (3-17) $16
Child 2 & Under $Free
Senior (60+) $16
College Student* $14
Military Active and Veterans* $14
Military* Active Duty & Veterans $14

*Valid ID Required.

Purchase tickets at the Ticket Counter. Prices are subject to change.

Hours

Opens tomorrow at 9a
Tues-Fri 9a - 4p
Sat & Sun 10a - 5p